How dead is dead? (with synth soundtrack)

Log life.

Unseen worlds keep appearing when I closely scrutinise rocks and dead logs. Mosses, beetles, lichen, fungi, slime moulds, springtails, mites, spiders, webs, flies, all find their own perfect and ever-changing corners. My eyes can hardly keep up.

it echoes in my head: how dead is a dead log? How inanimate is a stone?

and so I wrote a little song about it:

A log dweller that deserves more attention is the slime mould. They’re into decaying matter: bacteria, fungi, leaves; the stuff on rotting logs…. they come in many shapes, colours and sizes (see pictures below). Slime moulds are well described as animal/fungus hybrids. Like a fungus, they produce spores. Like an animal, they move to hunt for food. Ever so slowly.


But sometimes I don’t even know what I’m seeing anymore. Today, I saw a perfect mushroom-shape covering the ground like a blanket. A decaying amanita. A big beetle and a few springtails seemed to have a good time in it. Texture: slime mould-esque.

More than dead, more than a mushroom.

Shadow Man

Shadow man is coming to get you, water

but it is only the tree who lives to tell the tale

the tree, a movie screen for light to play

toes and stones in the water, ripples in the pines.

Pines at Hoffman's dam, Naseby, New Zealand.


Pulse pulse pulse
in many rhythms
one second never like the next
until you disintegrate

Plants Dance on Water

Water rhythms — Who says that trees don't dance?

Fallen flowers like swans, curve with the shape of river flow bending around the rocks. When do fallen flowers die?

Filmed at Deep stream (1), and Leith River (2), Otago, New Zealand.